Last 2015 costume day approaches

After a busy summer the last costume day of the season is nearly here. Come along next Monday (August Bank Holiday), if you can, to find out how the Arundell family and their household dressed in the sixteenth century. 

Tomorrow (Wednesday 26 August) is also our last dancing day of the summer if you fancy a bit of a Tudor workout. 

Both run from 11am-1pm and 2pm-4pm.

Tripping the light fantastic…

…or tripping up! 

We’ve been learning new steps for Tudor dancing on Wednesdays, the Scottish Branle, which is much quicker than other dances we’ve done so far and involves kicks and jumps. I think we’ve almost got it, although keeping balance and remembering lefts and rights has been tricky – nearly toppled once or twice. 

Hardly less energetic, the costume days have been going down well this summer. Only three left to go.

If anyone fancies a Tudor-themed workout volunteering at Trerice is the place! 

Getting ready for summer 2015

We’ve been a bit quiet on the blog over the last few weeks but we’ve been rather loud and busy in the sewing room!

We’re looking forward to our next costume day for visitors on Monday 27 July.  

We’ve been making new and adapting old clothes for volunteers and staff to wear during our ‘Tudor-tastic’ August (which actually starts in the last week of July!). We have house, garden and shop people eager to join in.

      

The hobby horse jousting is back again this summer, and have been revamped – ably modelled by our Tudor assistant in the photo.

  
Some of us have also been learning Tudor dances because we’re having dancing workshops on Wednesdays during August. It’s quite gentle and basic so far, but we haven’t tried it out in Tudor dress yet. We’re not quite ready for galliards and voltas…

We’ve also made a start on a set of outfits for younger school children, about 6 yrs old. The girls are finished, next step is to complete the boys’ schoolboy outfits. 

Hats, gloves and photos

One of the last hats to make for the schools’ project is a straw hat for a farm labourer. We picked up a bundle of plaited straw at the reenactment fair last year, but it’s taken a while to work out what to do as it didn’t come with instructions, leading to quite a lot of guess work. 

The straw was soaked in water first for a short while, before the end was curled around and sewn together. The straw was sewn in a spiral, flattening along the way, occasionally pausing to shape it over a mould – a bowl of a suitable size and shape. The brim was a continuation of the crown. Stones were used as weights to flatten it while it dried. 

   
 

Over 20 metres of linen thread was used to sew it together and there’s still enough straw left to make probably another two hats.     

Our skilled embroiderer and lace maker have been at it again. They have, barring a few sequins, finished the embroidered gloves using the pattern in Seventeenth Century Women’s dress patterns book 1. They look amazing! 

  
 

Another volunteer is making a headdress which includes a hair net with gold thread. After several trials of different types the final net is based on instructions for a parrot net. Still need to get a photo of it, but it looks very impressive.

Our next costume day is on Monday 25 May – it’s not just for kids, and has proved very popular with adults. Photos from the last event, on 4 May, have just gone on to the photo gallery.  

   

Easter Monday

We had an enjoyable first costume day of 2015, busy but not too manic, allowing us to get back in to the swing of things. The new outfits looked great on the various people who tried them. Lots of photos were taken – just finished sorting through them and posted some here on the drop down list under the photo gallery tab.

We even had a mention in a national newspaper! A columnist in the Daily Telegraph at the end of March wrote about how visits to National Trust properties have changed over time, and there is more jollity now with activities such as chocolate Easter trails and Tudor dressing up at Trerice. We were even mentioned in the same paragraph as Poldark, which will be the closest we ever get to Aidan Turner! 

(Trerice was Winston Graham’s inspiration for Trenwith, one of the Poldark family’s houses)

Our next costume day is Monday 4 May.

Arundell Wardrobe Unlock’d 2015

There’s only one more day left before the first costume day of the new season. On Easter Monday visitors of all ages will have an opportunity to try on clothes based on the Arundell brasses from the 1560s and 1570s, and get a taste of life as one of the household at Trerice in the reign of Elizabeth I. 

We’ve spent the last week or so putting the finishing touches to some new costumes, and tweaking some of the old ones. The new grey gown with farthingale is finished and is awaiting it’s first trying on. 

We look forward to seeing everyone tomorrow in the Hayloft. 

Celebrating Richard Arundell

While the rest of the country are full of anticipation awaiting the reburial of Richard III, we’ve been thinking about our own Richard – the first Lord Arundell of Trerice, who was created Baron Arundell 350 years ago today (23 March 1665).

Richard Arundell was born c1616, and became an MP for Lostwithiel in 1640. When the civil war broke out he fought for the King as a colonel of Cornish infantry. He was at the battles of Edgehill and Lansdown before joining his father John and the garrison at Pendennis Castle in 1646. The family’s estates were later confiscated and they were fined £10,000. The King had apparently promised ennoblement in 1643 but it was not until after the Restoration that it was possible and not until 1665 that Arundell had regained his fortune to be able to uphold the dignity. Like his father, Richard was also governor of Pendennis Castle, a position he held from the 1660s until his death in 1687. 

It seemed like a good excuse for cake! 



Bringing up the Bodies – or Heads will roll

This week we’ve been finishing off some more of the schools’ project outfits. There’s only a couple of hats to make up and a few alterations to carry out. We’ve also continued making our models for displaying our work in the Great Chamber next week. 

The papier mâché heads have now dried out thoroughly and it’s quite satisfying to  pop the balloons and hear them peel away inside. The next step was to cover them with some muslin or thin linen over some strategically placed wadding for chins and cheekbones. They look great from the front but a little Frankenstein-like at the back…

The bodies are made from broom handles and a short bit of wood for the shoulders, covered with two pillows, supported by stands, including the bases of garden umbrellas and Christmas trees. Some of the heads need a little more attention to make them stay upright – that’s a job for Monday morning. It’s surprising how some of the pillow bodies need to lose weight already!